Some countries have local rules and do require an agent to secure permits and unfortunately, we can do nothing to change this. Generally though, direct access to CAA offices is the way we prefer to secure permits. By doing so, we cut out the “middle man” cost and thus pass on this saving to the customer by means of lower support costs. This also reduces the chance of errors being made in the application process.

Over the years, we have built up excellent relationships with most CAA offices around the world and most permits can be secured within 24-48hrs, sometimes less. Short notice permits are generally no problem to secure.

Part of the service we provide is to secure the necessary clearances for air test or demonstration flights, whereby for example, approval is required from the UK Military to use their airspace. We also specialise is securing the necessary approvals and/or exemptions for aircraft being flown on temporary airworthiness certificates or special flight permits.

Our pricing is kept down by means of avoiding third parties or agents wherever possible. For example, nearly all of our overfly and landing permit applications are made direct to the applicable CAA office rather than via an agent locally.

Special Flight Permit (Flight Authorisation)

What is it, and why do you need one?

For many countries, if an aircraft is operating in a normal category or configuration, an Overflight or Landing permit is generally not required. Sometimes, however, the aircraft will not meet the full airworthiness requirements, but is still safe to fly. New deliveries, ferry flights to a new operator, maintenance flights, may all have special circumstances that result in the aircraft operating with a Special Airworthiness Certificate as issued by a DAR representing the country of registry Civil Aviation Authority.

The most common type of Special Airworthiness Certificate is a regular Ferry Permit. The US FAA call this a ‘Special Flight Permit’, and in EASA’s term is a ‘Permit to Fly.

Most are issued with a list of restrictions, or limitations, that apply to the Special Flight Permit.

Every aircraft operating on a Special Airworthiness Certificate requires a Special Authorisation or validation from each country being overflown or landed in. This is normally requested from the Civil Aviation Authority for that country, or the Technical Department of the Civil Aviation Authority. Official processing times can be up to 20 days but are often much less.

Don’t be caught out and think that with a ferry permit you can just fly. Each country has unique procedures or requirements. We have the knowledge and contacts in place to cover all scenarios. Plus we do not use agents to make these arrangements thus reducing the overall cost for the customer.

RVSM

Part of our permit service offerings for mostly ferry flight operations, is to secure temporary RVSM approvals. Why make additional fuel stops as a result of flying below RVSM airspace when a simple, straight-forward application to the relevant authority can provide access to upper airspace thus reducing fuel burn.

We can provide Letters of Authorization (LOA) to operate specific aircraft in Special Areas of Operation for short-term operations. Short-term operations include aircraft delivery or ferry, sales demonstration, operations for aircraft modification or repair and any other short-term operation to which an authority is applicable

LOAs for USA registered aircraft are issued for ferry flights and other short-term operations. In order to qualify for the LOA the aircraft must be issued a Special Ferry Permit (SFP) and meet the aircraft and crew training requirements for the desired Special Area of Operation.

Our RVSM partner provides the documentation to the authority to demonstrate that the operational and airworthiness requirements of the aircraft and crew have been met to conduct the applicable special operation (RVSM, RNP-10, MNPS/HLA). Once issued, the LOA must be carried onboard the aircraft for the duration of the operation.

 

Contact us for more details.